My horse has been acting very weird lately. When I tack her up and tighten the girth and am about to get on, she violently paws her leg almost as if she's...(Continued in comments)

Horses will do things for a reason and it is your job to find the main cause and solve it.
Since you said she refuses to move forward, I believe from the information you have given that it is either a disrespect issue or a pain issue.
Considering that you pointed out that she will often refuse to walk when saddled, I'm leaning more towards the problem being that she is disrespectful. Now, a disrespectful horse is not a 'naughty' horse, but simply a horse that does not see her owner as a leader she can trust in. Therefore, it is your job to move her feet and let her know that you are her leader. Moving a horses feet left, right and centre gains their respect - and is the only way to gain there respect. Do this through general groundwork, such as lunging, backing, yielding her hindquarters, etc.
Punishment through using a whip when she paws will do nothing but confuse the horse and make her fearful of you.
I advise that you address the issue in an arena with a lunge line. Saddle up your horse in the arena and if she paws, put her straight into work by lunging. By making the wrong thing hard (pawing) and the right thing easy (not pawing and moving forward), you will eventually get to the point where your horse will relate pawing to work, so she will be hesitant to do it.
Note that pawing is not a horse being 'sassy', it is simply her way of communicating to you that she is uncomfortable with what is being asked of her.
I hope this helps!
The panels are actually shorter on my dressage saddle than my hunt saddle (because it's a smaller seat size). Like I said I had a saddle fitter out this spring but I haven't ridden in it for two months (because I was preparing for a hunt show) and now when I put it on and tighten the girth she does the pawing and refuses to walk. Everything looks like it still fits but I'm wondering if there's something we can't see that's bothering her. I should also mention that she LOVES dressage and hates hunt, so it shouldn't be an issue that she doesn't want to ride in her dressage saddle.
Yes that's very interesting hmmm as you said she's proabably just being sassy then but very odd when it's mostly with the dressage saddle, could it be the extra weight on her back? Or her being sensitive to the longer pannels?
Maddie, we thought she might be bothered by the girth as well but my girth does have elastic on the ends. I tried using my trainers nicer girth and she still did it the same amount. The thing that makes me question if she's really being sassy is that she mostly only does it with her dressage saddle.
Maybe use a girth with elastic bits on it if you think she might be reacting to the pressure? The elastic will just give that little bit of give for her to be more comfortable but it could just be her trying to be a bossy mare
Hi Lauren,

I think it might be that she is being sassy, therefore you might consider holding a dressage whip and when she turns just tap her on her face
Kicking at her stomach. We know it's not ulcers because she was just treated for them and she's on smartpak's smartgut ultra and she tests negative for them now. We have observed that she does this more with her dressage saddle. She does it once or twice in my jumping saddle but it eventually gets better. I have not ridden in my dressage saddle for a couple months, but she has done this before with the saddle. I've had the saddle for two years now and it's always been the one that has fit her best. I had a saddle fitter out this spring to adjust both my saddles. It still fits her well, from what we can tell. And it also has air panels, so there can't be any pressure points. I don't know if it's attitude (she is a sassy mare sometimes) or if something is actually bothering. Any opinion would be appreciated! Thanks! (Ps. When she was doing the pawing this spring, I had the vet out and that's when she was diagnosed with ulcers. She is treated and good to go)
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