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My Arab skips every couple of seconds when in trot. She is not sore as was doing it fine on lunge but really baffled on why she is doing it?

My Arab skips every couple of seconds when in trot. She is not sore as was doing it fine on lunge but really baffled on why she is doing it?
She's only done it once in the past week any ideas? Only does it in the arena.
It could be back pain
My thought is that she does it to try it on and an excuse to go faster. I think she does it much more with her owner because she knows she is nervous and can get away with things. When I put poles down she goes nuts so for now because I'm still working on her with that I just did different sized circles and lots of trot walk transitions and she was really good and chilled and like I said only skipped once or twice.
Thank you. She's 17 but hasn't been in the arena for over a year. Started working with her a week or two ago and she was very hot and forward going. I've now got her ten times better. She rarely does it with me and it's only ever in trot however when her owner gets on her who is nervous and hasn't ridden her for more than a year due to loosing confidence after a bad fall she skips all the time and I'm unsure why. I ride her today she only did it twice one when I was doing a canter transition and she was trying to do a faster trot and I said no and another when we were going in a slow trot which I assumed was hard for her. Any suggestions?
Hey Leah, is he a young horse?

If he's a young horse and also an arab horse it's normal at the beginning! Then I advice you to take a personal inventory of how you're feeling and responding, and be sure to focus in a positive way on what you want to happen. It's natural to get impatient with a horse when you sense he's not paying attention to you, but don't let those emotions rule.

Make sure you're clear about what you want your horse to do (not just what you don't want him to do). The faster the horse moves, the slower your hands should move. That way, your actions are definite and your horse will have time to respond to them.

Practice being in control from the first steps of the ride, so you don't end up having to react each time your horse reacts to a distraction. Don't scold him for being energetic. Give him lots of little jobs so that he is absorbed with doing what you ask. Keep him busy.