Alanna Gamble Jumping | 13 Questions | 19 Answers

Any ideas on how to stop a horse from running away from you? During the day they’re out in the paddocks and whenever i go to get my horse, she runs away and she does this to everyone.

Any ideas on how to stop a horse from running away from you? During the day they’re out in the paddocks and whenever i go to get my horse, she runs away and she does this to everyone.
9
Thank you everyone for your help really appreciate it :)
Bring a bucket of food. It doesn’t have to be good but just something that makes a sound when you shake it. Or have treats in your hand and hold it under the nose of your headcollar
Try bringing her treats every time you go to catch her in the paddock, give it to her when she gets close to you si she undesteands that's the right thing to do, after a while she will come as soon as she recognises you.
My horse always 'welcome' me, he comes toward me and calls me, it's so cute anche satisfying 😻
watch Rick gore “think like a horse”’s video on catching a hard to catch horse! It’s super great, very informational, and super accurate.
A horse that runs away from you is a horse who disrespects you and does not see you as a leader. Treats do NOT make the horse respect you - rather they make the horse more disrespectful and pushy since they will be after treats all of the time. In a field environment, this could be dangerous, especially if other horses want to get involved.

It's easily solved by making the wrong thing hard and the right thing easy.
To gain the respect of your horse, move his feet forwards, left right and backwards. This can be done through lots of groundwork, such as lunging for respect, yielding the hindquarters/forequarters, backing up, etc. One important factor to remember is that if your horse wants to move, let him, and make moving the 'wrong' thing to do by making him work harder. Allow him to work when he's away from you (lunge or roundpen) and allow him to rest when he's next to you, so he begins to associate being with you with relaxing and being away from you with work.
It's because of this method that my mare trots over immediately when she sees me. No treats needed. Just confidence, a whole lot of groundwork and respect.
Doing this in an enclosed space beforehand will set your horse up for success for when you're out in the field attempting to catch him.
Once this is established, it's a good idea to visit your horse in the field holding his headcollar but do not catch him. Instead, approach him and retreat when he approaches you, or go up to him, give him a pat and leave so he does not expect to be caught every time you're seen with a headcollar in the field. It takes time and effort on your behalf, but it will make catching him a dream.

Just to make it easier - make sure you:
- don't 'creep' on the horse. Horses will sense your body language and uncertainty about him running off, and he will do so. Approach him confidently and directly, not hiding his headcollar.
- visit him in the field often with his headcollar, so he doesn't presume he will be caught every time you enter.
- do not chase him around with treats. Treats may only be rewarded if he approaches YOU, not the other way round, and only when his headcollar is on.

Good luck! It sure is a habit to break, but if you move his feet, gain his respect and make you a desirable person to be around, then he will relate you with positive experiences, which is exactly what you need.
Apologies - it's a lot to read haha.
Try join up and then bring treats
maybe bring some treats out and patient and slowest train her to come
I recommend bringing along food or treats
I'd do some bonding exercises like lose schooling in a small lungeing school and things like that and spend loads of time with your horse not just riding but also walks, treats, stroke him around its body until it will trust you, respect you and will be looking forward to see you again and walking by your side without you holding it 😊😉
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